Keeping it colourful and traditional

Team Nunavut unveils uniform for 2016 Arctic Winter Games

James McCarthy | Nunavut
February 29, 2016
photo courtesy of Team Nunavut Jarrett Seeteenak, left, Megan Hachey, Taylor Lee Sweetland and Dawn Himga show off Team Nunavut’s uniform for the 2016 Arctic Winter Games.

photo courtesy of Team Nunavut
Jarrett Seeteenak, left, Megan Hachey, Taylor Lee Sweetland and Dawn Himga show off Team Nunavut’s uniform for the 2016 Arctic Winter Games.

Team Nunavut has kept it simple over the years when it comes to its uniform for the Arctic Winter Games.
The colour scheme has always been red, yellow and blue and not much has changed this time around.
The 2016 version of the uniform was released on Feb. 29 and it’s sure to be one which will see plenty of offers for trades.
Mariele dePeuter, Team Nunavut’s chef de mission, said one of the changes people will notice for this year is the outer jacket will be blue as opposed to red and yellow from two years ago.
The other big change is black pants; they were blue two years ago.
“The liner jacket is what grabs people’s attention and we tried to keep it the same,” said dePeuter. “That’s so people get what they expect but giving something different.”
The front of the liner jacket also features an inuksuk while the back of the jacket is red with an outline of Nunavut itself.
DePeuter said she wouldn’t be surprised if most of the athletes came home without the uniform they went over with.
“That’s what we use to judge how well the kids liked it,” she said. “How many kids come home with their stuff and what can they bargain for?”
There’s also the small issue of pin trading, which is a sport in itself whenever the Games are on and it will be no different this time. Like in past years, Nunavut’s team pin set consists of several parts which make up a design of some sort.
DePeuter said this year’s pin will have eight parts to it.
“This year, it will be a carver working on a carving of an owl,” she said. “It displays more of the cultural side of the Games.”
So with uniforms all set to go, the biggest thing will be getting everyone over in one piece. Nunavut has the luxury of not being the furthest place away from Greenland, which makes travel a bit less hectic than, say, Alaska.
The big part of determining travel is who’s already in Iqaluit for the various training camps happening before the Games begin. All of the flights heading to Nuuk will depart from Iqaluit, making transportation a bit less stressful.
DePeuter said the flights coming in from the Kitikmeot and Kivalliq regions will arrive once the first two flights have already left for Nuuk on March 4.
“We have to make sure our futsal athletes are there early because they have one of the first practices,” she said.
DePeuter will be on the ground in Nuuk to meet the first two plane loads of athletes. The first flight over from Iqaluit will have mission staff on board to help dePeuter out. Other mission staff will be on the ground in Iqaluit to help co-ordinate things from that end.